TOTALLY UNCORKED ON MARKETING

Elaine Fogel

Guest post by Jeffrey Gitomer

customer-engagement-canstockphoto19151953What is engagement?

Better stated, how can you engage other people to become interested in you and your product or service? Dale Carnegie (How to Win Friends and Influence People) says by becoming interested in them. And he’s partially right.

The reality, and the secret of engagement is that BOTH people must be mutually engaged and mutually interested, and BOTH people must be intellectually stimulated and emotionally connected. Otherwise it’s just a conversation that will be forgotten, unless the salesperson is taking notes. #notlikely.

What is the secret ingredient of engagement?

The key to deepening a sales conversation, or any conversation for that matter, is to connect emotionally. Favorite teams, kids, college create emotion when spoken about, and the feelings and or situations are mutual.

The secret ingredient of engagement is emotion. Emotion is a key link to rapport, relaxation, and response. Emotion takes conversations deeper and becomes more open. The desire to talk and reveal becomes more intense. It pushes you to trade stories and discover similarities.

To help you get the picture of why engagement and emotional engagement are so important, and how to start the process, I am offering two examples and scenarios:

  1. FIND THE LINK! What do you have in common with your prospect? That will build rapport and lead you to a sale faster than anything.

Contrary to popular belief, “Customer types” don’t matter. That’s right, take your amiable, driver, tightwad analytic types and toss them in the trash. My favorite type of customer is one that has a wallet with a credit card in it. Oh wait, that’s everybody.

 Here’s the challenge… If you spend 30 minutes trying to figure out what type of person you’re dealing with, and then all of a sudden discover you both like model trains – or your kids both play soccer in the same league – or you both went to the same college – or you both grew up in the same town – or you both like the same sports teams — you will most likely make the sale no matter what type of person he or she is.

Personal things “in common” lead to a friendship, a relationship, and lots of sales.

  1. FIND THE MEMORY! If you can find one thing about the other person, and do something creative and memorable about it — you can earn the appointment, build friendship, create smiles, and make a sale.

I was courting a big client in Milwaukee. Found out the guy liked chocolate and was a Green Bay Packer fan. The next day I sent him a Packer hat full of chocolate covered footballs. The next day I was hired. Coincidence or luck? I have no idea. I just continue to do the same type of thing as often as I can, and continue to make sales.

I was courting a big client in Seattle. Found out the guy liked baseball. Sent him a Louisville Slugger baseball bat with his name engraved on it. Needless to say I hit a home run (sorry for that).

INSIGHT: To establish the ultimate long-term relationship and to be memorable in the service you perform, you need personal information about your prospect or customer. Information that provides you with insight, understanding, and possible links. (And, oh yes, lots of sales.) The difference between making one sale and building a long-term relationship lies in your ability to get this information.

BIGGER INSIGHT: The more information you have, the better (and easier) it is to establish rapport, follow-up and have something to say, build the relationship, and gain enough comfort to make the first sale, and with consistent follow-through, many more.

BIGGEST INSIGHT: If given a choice, people will buy from those they can relate to. People they like. People they trust. This stems from things-in-common. If you have the right information, and use it to be memorable, you have a decided advantage. Or you can decide “It’s too much work, I can make the sale without it.”

This philosophy gives the advantage to someone else – your competitor.

Jeffrey GitomerJeffrey Gitomer is the author of twelve best-selling books including The Sales Bible, The Little Red Book of Selling, The Little Gold Book of Yes! Attitude, and 21.5 Unbreakable Laws of Selling.  His real-world ideas and content are also available as online courses at www.GitomerVT.com. For information about training and seminars visit www.Gitomer.com or www.GitomerCertifiedAdvisors.com, or email Jeffrey personally at salesman@gitomer.com.

© 2015 All Rights Reserved. Don’t even think about reproducing this document without written permission from Jeffrey H. Gitomer and Buy Gitomer. 704/333-1112

beyond-your-logo-3dSign up to receive news about the launch of my new book, Beyond Your Logo: 7 Brand Ideas That Matter Most for Small Business SuccessGet free excerpts, opportunities to win prizes, and maybe even receive an advanced copy before release.

 

 

 

Share this post! facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailfacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

marketing-news-tidbitsI’m a tad late on posting this, so I figured it’s better to write a couple of tidbits than none at all. Here goes:

  • According to a report in Content Standard about a new Harvard Business Review study, The Most (and Least) Empathetic Companies on Twitter, “Twitter marketing is a balanced mix of intuition, personableness, data analysis, and good content to share.” However, “not every brand has found this sweet spot—including, surprisingly, some very popular brands.” Its advice?

The key to Twitter appears to be more intuitive than anything else: People respond well to people, not template posts or copied-and-pasted text, aggressive posturing, or impersonal broadcasting. Putting even slight effort into making your account personal will go a long way toward improving in this respect.”

  • Now, here’s a switch. A study from marketing services specialists, Sensis, found consumers are more interested in receiving offers, incentives and give-aways than merely talking to companies. So much for engagement and dialog, right? It’s counterintuitive to what we all thought was a no-no – overtly selling in social media. The study found that while 84% of marketers are looking to open a conversation, most [customers] want discounts (45%), give-aways (35%) and coupons (30%). But less than a third of companies are currently offering such promotions. (mUmBRELLA)

sensis-study

 

beyond-your-logo-3dSign up to receive news about the launch of my new book, Beyond Your Logo: 7 Brand Ideas That Matter Most for Small Business SuccessGet free excerpts, opportunities to win prizes, and maybe even receive an advanced copy before release.

 

Share this post! facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailfacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Web internet computer browser with video play buttonHave you added videos to your marketing mix? It turns out that 50% of online videos account for 50% of all mobile traffic.

A new infographic from HighQ Solutions shows that 78% of people watch videos online every week already, and predicts that by 2018 video will take up 79% of all consumer internet traffic! As for B2B (business-to-business) companies, 96% are planning to use video in their content marketing in the next year.

So, I thought it would be an apropos time to share my newest video with you. (Wasn’t that a good lead-in?) Don’t worry, I’ll share the infographic, too. Continue reading

Share this post! facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailfacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

ppai-week-15May 18-22, 2015 marks Promotional Products Week! So, what does that mean exactly?

This annual event serves as a cornerstone for recognizing the importance of working with promotional products professionals while creating awareness for promotional products as a powerful and effective medium. And, since Solutions Marketing & Consulting is a promotional products distributor, I thought I’d share some very interesting facts with you. Ready?

First, let’s define what promotional products are. According to the PPAI (Promotional Products Association International):

Promotional products usually imprinted with a company’s name, logo or message — include useful or decorative articles of merchandise that are used in marketing and communication programs. Imprinted products that are distributed free are called promotional products. Imprinted items given as an incentive for a specific action are known as premiums. Business gifts, awards and commemoratives are also considered promotional products.”

Who Buys Promotional Products?

Continue reading

Share this post! facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailfacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

marketing-news-tidbitsI’d like to share two news tidbits and three excellent marketing quotes I discovered this week.

Tidbits:

  • The mobile revolution is complete. Smartphones account for more than half of searches in 10 countries—including the U.S. and Japan—according to Google, which didn’t release exact percentages or a full list of countries. (Adweek)
  • A study by Pinterest and MillwardBrown shows that the image-based social network not only helps consumers discover new ideas and products, it also helps them find stuff to buy. (Helen Leggatt, BizReport)

Quotes:

Continue reading

Share this post! facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailfacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

3-dumb-thingsLet’s be honest. It’s tough to hold yourself together when a customer is upset and complaining. There’s a natural tendency to get defensive and say things on the spur of the moment.

Big Mistake!

The first things that pop into your mind come from an emotional response, not an intellectual one. So, if you’ve ever heard yourself say any of these 3 dumb things, don’t fret! Read ’em, forget ’em, and never use them again!

1. “None of our other customers have complained.” (Ouch)

What message does this send? It implies that the customer is an anomaly, a complainer, and a pain in the ass, and has unrealistic expectations. In other words, “Everyone else is satisfied, so why aren’t you?” Continue reading

Share this post! facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailfacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

spammy emailsHave you been receiving more spammy LinkedIn messages these days? I know that I am.

Receiving broadcast sales messages from fellow group members and other individual members not only defeats the entire purpose of LinkedIn, it is annoying!

LinkedIn Purpose:

“Our mission is to connect the world’s professionals to allow them to be more productive and successful. Our services are designed to promote economic opportunity for our members by enabling you and millions of other professionals to meet, exchange ideas, learn, and find opportunities or employees, work, and make decisions in a network of trusted relationships.”

LinkedIn User Agreement:

“8.2. Don’ts. You agree that you will not: Post any unsolicited or unauthorized advertising, “junk mail,” “spam,” “chain letters,” “pyramid schemes,” or any other form of solicitation unauthorized by LinkedIn.”

It’s gotten to the point where I procrastinate reading my messages because I know that many of them will be spammy in nature.

So, what to do?

Well, as I see it, you have five (5) choices. Continue reading

Share this post! facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailfacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail
1 2 3 100

Subscribe to My Blog by Feed

Use your favorite feed. 

Subscribe to My Blog Via Email

Check Out My Upcoming Book!

Get My Newsletters!

FREE MARKETING NEWSLETTERS!
Solutions Spotlight - Business Edition



* required/We never share your information.

Contributor to:

SmallBizClub
MarketingProfs-Logo

My Company

Solutions Marketing & Consulting

Excellent Marketing Books!

Excellent Marketing Books!
Amaze Every Customer
Youtility
Breakthrough NP Branding
Secrets of Ad Agency Owners

Categories

Archived Posts